WaterAid

WaterAid

Clean drinking water, proper toilets and good hygiene are essential, yet millions of people don’t have these basic services. WaterAid transforms the lives of the poorest and most marginalised people by improving access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene.

Facts about our job

  • 650 million people live without safe water.
  • 2.3 billion people, one in three, don’t have access to a toilet.
  • Just £15 can help provide one person with safe water.

650 million people don’t have access to safe water. Without this basic service, they have no choice but to drink dirty water that could kill them. Everyone everywhere needs a safe and sustainable supply of water: for drinking, washing, cleaning, cooking and growing food. It’s a basic human right.

2.3 billion people – one in three – don’t have access to a proper toilet. Many are forced to go in the open, spreading deadly diseases. A toilet is something everyone should take for granted – at home, school, work and in public places. It protects people from dangerous diseases and improves their safety and dignity.

Without good hygiene, such as handwashing, people can’t stay clean and deadly diseases spread fast. Something as simple as handwashing with soap could halve the number of cases of diarrhoea. Good hygiene maximises the benefits of safe water and proper toilets, keeping people healthy so they can go to school or earn a living.

WaterAid transforms the lives of the poorest and most marginalised people by improving access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene.

Our vision is a world where everyone everywhere has these basic human rights.

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Monthly Donations

  • £5 per month or £60 annually

    £60 could pay to test the water quality from a well or borehole in Liberia or Sierra Leone, or could pay for the cost of rehabilitating a latrine in Mali.

  • £7.50 per month or £90 annually

    £90 could pay for a tapstand in Nepal.

  • £10 per month or £120 annually

    £120 could pay for the cost of conducting analysis of water samples for one urban water point or well in Tanzania.

  • £20 per month or £240 annually

    £240 could pay for a school rainwater harvesting facility (with gutters, collection tank and fittings) for 200 children in India.